Emerald Studies in Media and Communication

Published Volumes & Author Biographies 

Volume 11: [New] Media Cultures  

Introduction
Laura Robinson, Shelia R. Cotten, Jeremy Schulz, Timothy M. Hale, Apryl Williams, and Joy Hightower 

Section I: Communicative Cultures

On Violating One’s Own Privacy: N-adic Utterances and Inadvertent Disclosures in Online Venues
Xiaoli Tian and Daniel A. Menchik

Couples’ Use of Technology in Maintaining Relationships
Xiaolin Zhuo

Section II: Media, Culture, and Identity

Spectacles of the Self(ie) Empowerment? Networked Individualism and the Logic of the (Post)Feminst Selfie
Stephen R. Barnard

You’ve Been Catfished: An Analysis of Postemotionalism in Reality Television and Audience Response on Twitter
Apryl A. Williams

Cultures of Experimentation: Role Playing Games and Sexual Identity
Ciaran Devlin and Anne Holohan

Section III: Public Cultures

Twitter Sentiments: Pattern Recognition and Poll Prediction
Francis P. Barclay, C. Pichandy, Anusha Venkat, and Sreedevi Sudhakaran

The Limits of Neoliberalism: How Writers and Editors Use Digital Technologies in the Literary Field
Matthew Clair

The Role of Mass Media in the Transmission of Culture
Julie B. Wiest

Section IV: Methods for Studying Media and Culture

Virtual Tours: Enhancing Qualitative Methodology to Holistically Capture Youth’s Social Realities
Ana Campos-Holland, Brooke Dinsmore, and Jasmine Kelekay

Sentiment Analysis of Polarizing Topics in Social Media: 
News Site Readers’ Comments on the Trayvon Martin Controversy
Gabe Ignatow, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, and Konstantinos Zougris


Volume 10: Digital Distinctions & Inequalities

Introduction by Laura Robinson, Shelia R. Cotten, Jeremy Schulz, Timothy M. Hale, Apryl Williams 

Section I: New Perspectives on Digital Stratification

Cultural Stratification on the Internet: Five Clusters of Values and Beliefs among Users in Britain
William H. Dutton , Grant Blank 

The Third-Level Digital Divide: Who Benefits Most from Being Online?
Alexander J. A. M. van Deursen , Ellen J. Helsper 

Section II: Diversities of Usage, Social Class, and Capital

What is New in the Digital Divide? Understanding Internet Use by Teenagers from Different Social Backgrounds
Marina Micheli 

From Divides to Capitals: An Exploration of Digital Divides as Expressions of Social and Cultural Capital
Eduardo Villanueva-Mansilla , Teresa Nakano , Inés Evaristo 

Section III: Emotions and Dispositions

Mind the Emotional Gap: The Impact of Emotional Costs on Student Learning Outcomes
Kuo-Ting Huang , Laura Robinson , Shelia R. Cotten 

Online Banking for the Ages: Generational Differences in Institutional and System Trust
Saleem Alhabash , Mengtian Jiang , Brandon Brooks , Nora J. Rifon , Robert LaRose , Shelia R. Cotten 

Section IV: Open WI-FI and Mobile Networks

Interethnic Ties via Mobile Communications in Homogeneous and Ethnically Mixed Cities: A Structural Diversification Approach
Yossef Arie , Gustavo S. Mesch 

Contextualizing Open Wi-Fi Network Use with Multiple Capitals
Christopher McConnell , Joseph Straubhaar 

Section V: Public Policy

Roads and Roadblocks to Digital Inclusion: An Analysis of a Public Policy Program in California
Blanca Gordo 



Volume 9: Politics, Participation, and Production

​Introduction by Laura Robinson, Shelia R. Cotten, & Jeremy Schulz 

​Section I: Politics

Political Efficacy on the Internet: A Media System Dependency Approach
​Katherine Ognyanova & Sandra Ball-Rokeach

​Engaging Young Voters in the Political Process: U.S. Presidential Debates and YouTube  
​Pamela Brubaker, Michael Horning, & Christopher Toula

​Generating Political Interest with Online News
​Shelley Boulianne

​Section II: Participation Networks

​Do Social Network Sites Increase, Decrease, or Supplement the Maintenance of Social Ties?
​Randy Lynn & James C. Witte

How Far Can Scholarly Networks Go? Examining the Relationships between Distance, Disciplines, Motivations, and Clusters 
​Guang Ying Mo, Zack Hayat, & Barry Wellman

​Family Social Networks, Reciprocal Socialization, and the Adoption of Social Media Media by Baby Boomer and Silent Generation Women
​Nancy Horak Randall, Sue Carroll Pauley, & Aaron B. Culley

​To Know that You Are Not Alone: The Effect of Internet Usage on LGBT Youth's Social Capital 
​Robert T. Cserni & Ilan Talmud

​Section III: Production

The Gendered Digital Production Gap: Inequalities of Affluence
​Jen Schradie

​Event vs. Issue: Twitter Reflections of Major News, a Case Study
​Chris J. Vargo, Ekaterina Basilaia, & Donald Lewis Shaw


Volume 8: Doing and Being Digital: Mediated Childhoods

​Introduction by Laura Robinson, Shelia R. Cotten, & Jeremy Schulz (download link)

​Section I: Digital Differentiation

​Stress 2.0: Social Media Overload among Swiss Teenagers
​Christoph Lutz, Giulia Ranzini, & Miriam Meckel

​Gradations of Disappearing Digital Divides Among Racially Diverse Middle School Students.
​Shelia R. Cotten, Elizabeth L. Davison, Daniel B. Shank, & Brian W. Ward

​Play to Pay?: Adolescent Video Game Play and STEM Choice
​Amanda J. Turner 

​Section II: Media Use

​Should I Text or Should I Call?: How College Students Navigate Mediated Connections with Family
​Carrie Anne Platt, Renee Bourdeaux, & Nancy DiTunnariello 

​Media Choice and Identity Work: A Case Study of Information Communication Technology Use in a Peer Community
​Airi Lampinen, Vilma Lehtinen, & Coye Cheshire

​Section III: Social Problems and Solutions

​Promoting Online Safety Among Adolescents: Enhancing Coping Self-Efficacy and Protective Behaviors through Enactive Mastery
​Julia Crouse Waddell, Caitlin McLaughlin, Robert Larose, & Nora Rifon

​Hey Kids, This Is Advertising: Metaphors and Promotional Appeals in Online Advertisements for Children
​Debashis ‘Deb’ Aikat

​Section IV: Cyberbullies and Upstanders

​Cyberbullying: The Social Construction of a Moral Panic
​Linda M. Waldron

​Tweens, Cyberbullying, and Moral Reasoning: Separating the Upstanders from the Bystanders
​Erhardt Graeff


Volume 11: [New] Media Cultures  
Author Biographies

Francis Philip Barclay is a journalist, writer, psephologist and media researcher. He has published and contributed chapters to several books, apart from research articles in reputed journals. His research area is media and politics. He has served several English newspapers in India and also secured a PhD in Journalism and Mass Communication. His works are available at http://www.francisbarclay.com.

Stephen Barnard is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at St. Lawrence University. His research interests focus on the sociology of new media, culture, and communication. His work has appeared elsewhere in Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism and Cultural Studies Critical Methodologies.

Ana Campos-Holland is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Connecticut College who specializes in the study of childhood and adolescence with a focus on youth peer cultures. Methodologically, she prioritizes qualitative approaches that create platforms for youth’s voices to be heard. She is currently working on a book manuscript that explores how youth navigate everyday disputes within their local peer cultures.

Matthew Clair is a Ph.D. candidate in the Harvard Department of Sociology and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research considers the cultural mechanisms that shape racial and socioeconomic inequality, crime and punishment, and the literary field. 

Ciaran Devlin graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a first class honours degree in Geography and Sociology. Her research interests include the sociology of gaming.

Brooke Dinsmore is an MA candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia. Her research interests are childhood and adolescence at the intersections of inequality with a focus on social media use within local peer cultures. She is currently working on a project that explores gendered and racialized internet humor within youth peer cultures. 

Nicholas Evangelopoulos is an associate professor of Decision Sciences at the University of North Texas and a Fellow of the Texas Center for Digital Knowledge. He received his Ph.D. in Decision Sciences from Washington State University and his M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Kansas. His research interests include statistics and text mining. His publications include articles appearing in MIS Quarterly, Communications of the ACM, Decision Sciences, Communications in Statistics, Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, and many others.

Anne Holohan is Assistant Professor in Sociology at Trinity College Dublin. She completed her PhD at UCLA and has been an Incoming Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Trento, Italy. Her books include Networks of Democracy: Lessons from Kosovo for Afghanistan, Iraq and Beyond (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Community, Competition and Citizen Science (Ashgate, 2013). 

Gabe Ignatow is an associate professor of Sociology at the University of North Texas where he has taught since 2007. His research interests are in the areas of sociological theory, text mining, new media, and information policy. Gabe’s current research involves adapting text mining methods developed in computer science and related disciplines for social science applications. He has been working with formal text analysis techniques since the 1990s, and has published this work in journals including Social Forces, Sociological Forum, Poetics, the Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, and the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 

Jasmine Kelekay is an MA candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are the critical studies of race and racism, as well as social control and punishment, with a particular focus on their intersections. Her MA thesis will explore the merging of critical mixed race studies and critical race criminology to examine how mixed race Black men experience racialization, criminalization, and social control in the U.S. context. 

Daniel A. Menchik is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Michigan State University. He is interested in ethnographic methods, language, and the dynamics of authority and status. His recent work focuses particularly on relationships among medical professionals and between patients and physicians.

C Pichandy is the former Head of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication in the PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore. He has published several articles in peer-reviewed journals and contributed book chapters. His area of research is ICT and its socio-cultural impacts. 

Sreedevi Sudhakaran is a research scholar in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore. She has published several papers in peer-reviewed journals. Her area of research is social media effects.

Xiaoli Tian is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include how preexisting knowledge paradigms and cultural norms influence the way people respond to unexpected transformations of their everyday routines. This interest is reflected in her two main lines of research: cross-cultural transmission of medical knowledge and online interaction.

Anusha Venkat is a research scholar in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore. She has published several papers in peer-reviewed journals. Her area of research is social media issues.

Julie B. Wiest, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of sociology at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She received her doctorate in sociology from the University of Tennessee and master’s degree in journalism and mass communication from the University of Georgia. Her primary research interests are in the areas of culture, new media technologies, mass media studies, and deviance. Her most recent research examines social change in the Middle East, focusing on the role of new media technologies, and her latest book (2011), “Creating Cultural Monsters: Serial Murder in America,” examines the sociocultural context of serial murder in the U.S. Before academic, she worked as a print and electronic journalist for nearly a decade.

Apryl A. Williams is a doctoral student and Diversity Fellow in the Department of Sociology and a research associate at the Center on Conflict and Development at Texas A&M University. Her current research explores media, communication, and digital inequality in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Her other work focuses on raced based differences in social media use among American millennials and has been published in the International Journal of Communication and Information, Communication & Society. Williams' additional research interests include postmodernism, identity, race & class, social theory, and fat studies. 

Xiaolin (Jo-Lynn) Zhuo is a doctoral student in Sociology at Harvard. She is originally from Puyang, China. She received her B.A. (Hons.) with High Distinction from the University of Toronto with a specialization in sociology and a minor in math in June 2012. During college, Xiaolin conducted network analysis on multidisciplinary scientific collaboration in Canada and ethnographic research on new rural economies in Indonesia. She is currently studying the impact of communication technology on social relationships and the trends in income inequality in U.S. cities. 

Konstantinos Zougris is an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii-West Oahu. His research interests are mainly in the area of comparative societies, digital sociology, and text analytics. Currently he is working on a several projects exploring sociological applications of text mining methodologies.


​Volume 10: Digital Distinctions & Inequalities
Author Biographies

Saleem Alhabash is an Assistant Professor of Public Relations and Social Media, jointly appointed by the Department of Advertising + Public Relations and the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism. His research focuses on the processes and effects of using new and social media. More specifically, his research untangles the ways in which computer-mediated communication can facilitate persuasion. His research has been published in Computers in Human Behavior, Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, New Media and Society, the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Interactive Advertising, and Mass Communication and Society. 

Yossef Arie is a Ph.D student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Haifa. He investigates differences and similarities between distinctive social groups in their social networks structure based on communication mediated by mobile phone.

Grant Blank is Survey Research Fellow at Oxford Internet Institute (OII). He is a sociologist who studies the social and cultural impact of the Internet and other new communication media. He is also interested in cultural sociology, especially reviews and cultural evaluation. He began his career as an independent consultant based in Chicago Illinois specializing in research design, statistical analysis, and database design. He previously taught at American University in Washington DC. He completed his PhD on the sociology of reviews at the University of Chicago in 1999, and joined OII in 2010. His research interests include: social and cultural impact of the Internet and other new media, quantitative analysis, methodology, cultural sociology, sociology of science and technology, and artificial intelligence.

Brandon Brooks is a PhD Candidate in the Media and Information Studies Program within the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. His research interests are at the intersection of Internet Governance, Communication and Technology, and Civic Engagement. He explores how citizen and government interactions are effected by Internet governance decisions within sociotechnical systems. He will be joining the faculty of Queens University of Charlotte in the fall of 2015

Shelia R. Cotten, a sociologist, is a Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. She studies technology use across the life course, and the social, educational, and health outcomes of using various technologies. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Her work has been recently published in Computers & Education, Social Science & Medicine, Computers in Human Behavior, Journal of Family Issues, Journal of Applied Gerontology, Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, and Information, Communication, and Society. She and Laura Robinson are the co-editors of the Emerald Series in Media and Communication. In 2013, she won the award for Public Sociology from the Communication and Information Technologies section of the American Sociological Association (CITASA).

J.A.M. van Deursen is an assistant professor at the University of Most of his research focuses on digital inequality in the contemporary information society. His doctorate dissertation, entitled ‘Internet skills, vital assets in an information society,’ focused on inequalities caused by different levels of Internet skills among segments in the Dutch population. The dissertation won the Herbert Dordick Dissertation award in 2011, an annual award handed out by the International Communication Association for the best dissertation in the field of communication and technology worldwide. 

William H. Dutton is the Quello Professor of Media and Information Policy in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences at MSU, where he serves as Director of the Quello Center. Bill was the first Professor of Internet Studies at the University of Oxford where he was founding director of the Oxford Internet Institute, and a Fellow of Balliol College, and a Professor Emeritus at the Annenberg School at USC, where he was elected President of the University’s Faculty Senate. He has recently edited the Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies (OUP 2013), four volumes on Politics and the Internet (Routledge 2014), and a reader entitled Society and the Internet, with Mark Graham (OUP 2014).

Inés Evaristo is affiliated with the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú
M.A., Open and Distance Learning, National Distance Education University of Spain. B.S. Educational Psychology, PUCP. Researcher and Lecturer on pedagogical practices integrating ICT, video games and digital competences in Education. Currently a researcher on video games and education at PUCP, she is also Head of Learning Technologies at the Technological University of Peru, http://dta.utp.edu.pe.  

Blanca Gordo
Blanca Gordo is a principal investigator at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, CA, where she leads a research team conducting an evaluation of the California Connects Program, a federal public policy initiative in California. The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) of the US Department of Commerce funds California Connects. She is also a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues (ISSI) at the University of California at Berkeley. Most recently, she was the Academic Coordinator for the Center for Latino Policy Research (CLPR) at the University of California at Berkeley, where she directed public policy initiatives, program development, and the Technology and Development Research Group. She holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley, and specializes in social problems and technology. Her perspective synthesizes regional and local economic development, urban poverty, technology development processes, organizational analysis and development, public policy, ethnic populations (African American and Latino), demographics, and social inequality structures. 

Ellen Helsper focuses on developing approaches to quantitative and qualitative research in relation to media and everyday life with a special interest in digital exclusion, media literacy and interpersonal interactions online. Her main research interest is in the role of digital media in everyday life of disadvantaged social groups. An important element is the development of a theoretical framework to understand the links between digital and social exclusion based on theories of socio-cultural capital and social identity. 

Kuo-Ting Huang is a doctoral student in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. His research interests lie in information and communication technologies (ICTs) with a focus on the effects of virtual environments on learning and education. His current research focuses on the social psychological effects of ICTs on education and health.

Mengtian Jiang is a PhD student in the Department of Advertising + Public Relations at Michigan State University. Her research interests include online persuasion, cyber-security and privacy, and consumer trust. She is interested in understanding how people are influenced and persuaded by online information and online strangers, with a particular focus on consumer trust. 

Robert LaRose is a full Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University where he teaches graduate courses in research methods and theory and serves as Director of the Media and Information Studies PhD program. His research interests are the uses and effects of new media. His current foci are the role of habits in media behavior and the adoption of broadband Internet among vulnerable populations. He is the co-author of a popular introductory textbook, Media Now. He was presented with the Outstanding Article Award for 2011 by the International Communication Association. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Theory and Research from the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California. 

Alexander Marina Micheli, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology and Social Research at Milano-Bicocca University. Her research examines the relationship between social stratification and digital media use among young people. She has been involved in several research projects focusing on: ICT and education, children or teenagers use of mobile devices and social-network sites, digital skills and media literacy.

Christopher McConnell has had an interest in the digital divide since his days as a technology reporter in the late 1990s. He received his Ph.D. in Radio-TV-Film from UT Austin in 2014. As a research fellow at UT Austin, his current interest in digital-inclusion issues is motivated by an interest in public participation online. With the advent in the US of internet-centered government services such as healthcare.gov and types of community participation that hinge on Internet use such as open data and civic hacking, it is increasingly unclear if members of society who have limited abilities to use the internet can fully engage with society and the lives of their communities.

Gustavo S. Mesch, is a Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Haifa (Israel). His research interests are Internet and social media effects on society, social inequalities in the diffusion and adoption of information and communication technologies, and youth media use and social networks. He served as the Chair of the Communication and Information Technologies Section of the American Sociological Association and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Israel Internet Association.

Teresa Nakano is affiliated with the Department of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú M.A. Social and Public Policy, Pompeu Fabra University; M.A. University Policy and Administration, Barcelona University. B.S. Educational Psychology, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Currently, Head of Directorate of Technical Education Services, Ministry of Education, Peru.

Nora J. Rifon is a full Professor in the Department of Advertising + Public Relations at Michigan State University. She earned her Ph.D. in Business, and her MA and BA in Psychology. Her research interests include consumer privacy and online safety, marketing communications strategies, corporate reputation, sponsorship, and children and media. Her work has been published in Communications of the ACM, New Media and Society, the Journal of Consumer Affairs, the Journal of Advertising, Advances in Consumer Research, Government Information Quarterly, the Journal of Interactive Advertising, and the International Journal of Advertising, and in the proceedings of a variety of International conferences. She has served on the Executive Committee and the Publications Committee of the American Academy of Advertising, and on the editorial review boards of the Journal of Advertising, the Journal of Consumer Affairs, and the Journal of Interactive Advertising, and served as consultant to the State of Michigan Office of the Attorney General, private law firms, and the commercial sector.

Laura Robinson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Santa Clara University. She earned her Ph.D. from UCLA where she held a Mellon Fellowship in Latin American Studies and received a Bourse d’Accueil at the École Normale Supérieure. In addition to holding a postdoctoral fellowship on a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation-funded project at the USC Annenberg Center, Robinson has served as Visiting Assistant Professor at Cornell University and Visiting Scholar at Trinity College Dublin. Her research has earned awards from CITASA, AOIR, and NCA IICD. Robinson’s current multi-year study examines digital and informational inequalities. Her other publications explore interaction and identity work, as well as new media in Brazil, France, and the United States. Her website is www.laurarobinson.org. Email: laura@laurarobinson.org.

Joseph Straubhaar is the Amon G. Carter Sr., Centennial Professor of Communication, the Associate Director of Telecommunications and Information Policy Institute, and the Director of the Latino and Latin American Media Studies Program at the University of Texas at Austin. He organized a joint ICA-IAMCR conference on the digital divide in 2002 and has organized and edited Inequity in the Technopolis: Race, Class, Gender and the Digital Divide in Austin (University of Texas Press, 2011). That book was based on a decade long project on the digital divide in Austin. That included historical analysis, tying the issue to segregated schools, to the way in which Austin became a planned technopolis, and to the evolving nature of the technology economy itself. It also feature multi-generational interviewing over time with a series of families to contrast generational, ethnic and gender experiences. With Sharon Strover, he has conducted state-wide surveys on the digital, and a multi-state project with her and Bob LaRose about rural broadband. He has also worked over the years on the digital divide, ICTs and development in Brazil.

Eduardo Villanueva-Mansilla earned his Ph.D. (Political Science), M.A. (Media Studies). Associate Professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru’s Department of Communications. His areas of research are the transformation of social and cultural relationships in developing countries as a consequence of the implementation of digital media, with an emphasis on education and cultural consumption, and the policies relating to and the political ramifications of digital media usage in Peru. His website is www.eduardovillanueva.pe. 


Volume 9: Politics, Participation, and Production
Author Biographies

Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach
University of Southern California
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach is a Professor of Communication and Sociology in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California. She is the Principal Investigator of the Metamorphosis Project (www.metamorph.org) which advances a communication infrastructure perspective on urban community under the forces of globalization, new communication technologies, and population diversity. Ball-Rokeach is the author or editor of seven books: Understanding Ethnic Media (with M. D. Matsaganis & V. S. Katz), Violence and the Media (with R. K. Baker), Theories of Mass Communication (with M. L. DeFleur), The Great American Values Test: Influencing Belief and Behavior through Television (with M. Rokeach & J. W. Grube), Media, Audience and Society (with M. G. Cantor), Paradoxes of Youth and Sport (with M. Gatz and M. Messner), and Technological Visions: The Hopes and Fears that Shape New Technologies (with M. Sturken and D. Thomas). She has published numerous articles in such journals as Communication Research, Journalism Quarterly, Mass Communication and Society, American Sociological Review, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Communication, New Media and Society, Social Problems, and The American Psychologist.

Ekaterina Basilaia
Tbilisi State University
Ekaterina has been a researcher and scholar for over seven years. Ekaterina also lectures at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University (TSU). Ekaterina holds three degrees. She obtained her BA in English and MA in linguistics at Tbilisi State University. In addition, Ekaterina has obtained a MS in Mass Communication at San Jose State University. Other recent publications include “The natural framing of military conflict news. The 2008 war in Georgia in Resonance, Izvestia and The New York Times” in the Central European Journal of Communication.

Shelley Boulianne
MacEwan University
Shelley Boulianne completed her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2007. She conducts research on media use, public opinion, as well as civic and political engagement, using meta-analysis techniques, experiments, and surveys. She also conducts research on survey research methodology, particularly on how to increase response rates to surveys. She is currently working with the Alberta Climate Dialogue, which is an international group of researchers engaged in a five-year project to study public deliberation about climate change in Alberta.

Pamela Jo Brubaker
Brigham Young University
Pamela Jo Brubaker is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Brigham Young University. She holds a Ph.D. in mass communications from The Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in mass communication from Brigham Young University. Her research focuses on the impact and use of new media for strategic communication campaigns, political communications, etc. Brubaker has approximately seven years of professional public relations experience in the technology industry, including positions in corporate and agency settings. She currently teaches courses in public relations research and strategic communications campaigns.

Robert T. Cserni
State University of New York
Robert Cserni is a graduate student researcher at the Department of Sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research topics include gender and sexuality, social networks, and organizational behavior. He is currently working to apply big data analyses to the study of masculinities. Robert has a Master's degree in organizational sociology from the University of Haifa in Israel (2012), where he studied the effects of Internet usage on LGBT youth's social capital. His B.A. in psychology and human services (2009) is also from the University of Haifa.

Aaron B. Culley
Wingate University
Aaron B. Culley is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Wingate University. His research agenda encompasses two general areas of interest. The first includes investigations into the specific belief and behavior of American Evangelical Protestants, in terms of their specific theological beliefs and how those intersect with their ideas and actions in terms of contemporary social and political issues. The other involves consideration of broader developments in the development of sociological theories, including how older theoretical notions can be re-interpreted and informed by more recent theoretical ideas and perspectives, as well as informed by current empirical research.

Zack Hayat
Sammy Ofer School of Communications
Tsahi (Zack) Hayat is a faculty member at the Sammy Ofer School of Communications, at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel and a collaborating researcher at NetLab, The University of Toronto. Mr. Hayat earned a BA in communications and computer science and an MA in communications at the University of Haifa, Israel. Mr Hayat earned his PhD at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto. His research focuses on the relationship between information and communication technologies (ICTs) and personal networks. He is particularly interested in how emerging technologies may enable or hinder the transfer of information and support within personal networks. Specifically, Mr. Hayat study research collaboration and the role ICTs play in forming and sustaining collaborative ties. In his PhD dissertation Mr. Hayat used the social network analysis framework to study the formation and evolution of research collaboration networks, as well as factors that contribute to productive collaboration. Mr. Hayat research has been supported by the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program (OGS), Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) of Canada, and the Mitacs-Accelerate Program.

Michael Horning
Virginia Tech
Michael Horning is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Virginia Tech. He holds a Ph.D. in Mass Communications from The Pennsylvania State University and a Masters in Communication and Media Technologies from The Rochester Institute of Technology. His research is focused on the social and psychological effects of communications technologies. He uses an interdisciplinary approach in his research that draw from both media effects and human computer interaction traditions. Prior to his appointment at Virginia Tech he worked in the Computer-Supported Collaboration and Learning Lab at Penn State with a team of researchers to develop and test location-aware news aggregation software. His current research has been focused on developing and testing mobile and web-based applications that support engagement with local news and community service organizations. He has also published papers on the effects of communications technologies on political and civic engagement.

Randy Lynn
George Mason University
Randy is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology, graduate lecturer, and graduate research fellow at George Mason University. His research interests include digital technologies, critical youth studies, education, social networks, and inequalities. He received his M.A. in sociology from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2009, and subsequently accepted a Presidential Scholarship to continue studies at GMU. He is a former graduate research fellow at GMU’s Center for Social Science Research, and is currently a fellow at GMU’s Institute for Immigration Research. He has also participated in programs at the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect at Cornell University, the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the University of Maryland, and the Internet Institute at the University of Oxford (UK). Randy’s dissertation will explore the social foundations of educational technology initiatives in contemporary U.S. high schools, using a mixed-method approach that combines a secondary analysis of national datasets with ethnographic interviews, focus groups, and observations. His work has been published in academic books and journals, and has been featured in the Huffington Post.

Guang Ying Mo
University of Toronto
Guang Ying Mo is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She is also a long-time member of NetLab, an interdisciplinary research lab studying the intersection of social networks. Ms. Mo’s research examines how network organizations influence the creation of innovations. She focuses on network structure’s effects on individual members’ performance and team productivity. In particular, she studies the relationship between diversity in scholarly networks, collaborative ties across disciplinary boundaries, and innovative outcomes. Using a multilevel framework, Ms. Mo combines social network analysis, multilevel models, and qualitative analysis to investigate the complexity of the process of research collaborations. Prior to enrolling in her current doctoral program, Ms. Mo obtained a PhD in Journalism from the Sophia University in Tokyo.

Katherine Ognyanova
Northeastern University
Katherine Ognyanova is a postdoctoral researcher at the Lazer Lab, Northeastern University, and a fellow at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University. She does work in the areas of computational social science and network analysis. Her research has a broad focus on transformations of the media system, political and civic engagement, and the impact of technology on social structures. Her past experience includes work with the Annenberg Networks Network, the Center for the Digital Future, the World Internet Project, the USC Metamorphosis Project, as well as a fellowship with the Federal Communications Commission. Katya received her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. She holds a B.Sc. in Computer Science, and M.A. degrees in Communication and Virtual Culture. For more information visit Katya’s website at www.kateto.net or follow her on Twitter at @Ognyanova.

Sue Carroll Pauley
Wingate University
Sue Carroll Pauley currently serves as Chair of the Department of Sociology at Wingate University. Having an early background in social services, she brings an interest in problem solving to her academic pursuits. Mate selection, work/family and generational issues are topics which are emphasized and explored in her Family Sociology courses. In addition, she enjoys directing students in career exploration in her Human Service courses.

Nancy Horak Randall
Wingate University
Nancy Horak Randall is the Harry and Frances Cannon Professor of Sociology and Human Services at Wingate University. Her research agenda focuses on social distance, including a community study which utilized survey research to examine social distance among Mexicans, whites, and blacks in a suburbanizing county in the southern US. She also studies behavioral indicators of social distance, such as Facebook friend lists and Twitter followers. She is currently focusing her research activities on understanding the process of adoption of social media by baby boomer and silent generation women.

Jen Schradie
University of California, Berkeley
Schradie is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California-Berkeley and the Berkeley Center for New Media. She has a master’s degree in sociology from UC Berkeley and a MPA from the Harvard Kennedy School. She studies social class, social media and social movements. Her broad research agenda is to interrogate digital democracy claims. After she published two articles on digital production inequality in Poetics and Information, Communication and Society, the publicity she garnered from these publications earned her the 2012 Public Sociology Alumni Prize at UC Berkeley. With a National Science Foundation Grant, she is researching the relationship between technology and democracy among social movement and labor organizations in the American South. Before entering academia, Jen directed six documentary films, including, “The Golf War – a story of land, golf and revolution in the Philippines.” Most of her films, however, focused on social movements confronting corporate power in the American rural South. Schradie’s documentaries have screened at more than 25 film festivals and 100 universities.

Donald Lewis Shaw
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Dr. Shaw, director of the Mountain Conference Program in Communication Research, is a journalism scholar and professor, retired U.S. Army Reserve officer and writer who has taught at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication since 1966. Now Kenan emeritus professor, he also has been visiting professor at six universities and lectured at dozens more. He is best known for his work, with Max McCombs of Texas, on the agenda-setting function of the press. He is author or co-author of ten books and scores of scholarly articles and papers. He served in the U.S. Army Reserves, N.C. Army National Guard, and U. S. Army for 32 years. In 2011, the Selective Service System awarded him a Distinguished Service Award for his 15 years as North Carolina State Director. He has been awarded the Paul Deutschmann Award for scholarly achievement and a Presidential Citation Award for career achievement for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition, he has earned the Harold L. Nelson Award for career achievement as well as the Dinerman Award for public opinion. In 2012, Shaw was initiated into the North Carolina Journalism Hall of Fame.

Ilan Talmud
University of Haifa
Prof. Ilan Talmud (Ph,D, Columbia University, 1992) is the Chair of Graduate Studies in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Haifa. His publications are in the areas of network models of economic sociology and Internet studies. Among his recent publications are the book (with Gustavo Mesch) “Wired Youth: The Social World of Adolescence in the Informative Age” (Routledge, 2010), and the Chapter “Economic Sociology” (in Sociopedia: The Online Encyclopedia of the International Sociological Association).

Christopher M. Toula
Georgia State University
Christopher M. Toula has an MA in Media Studies from Penn State and a BA with honours in Film Studies, Video Production and Creative Writing from Bucks New University. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Communication at Georgia State University. Mr. Toula currently teaches Communication Law, Public Speaking, Media Research Methods and Media Writing at Georgia State. His research areas include the following: critical globalization theory, political and economic rhetoric, law and international communication. He has given 11 conference presentations since 2008 and been published in the journal Cultural Studies.

Chris J. Vargo
The University of Alabama
Chris specializes in the use of computer science methods to investigate social media using theories from the communication and political science disciplines. Research methods of specialization include: text mining, machine learning, computer-assisted content analysis, data forecasting, information retrieval and network analysis. Chris accomplishes these tasks through computer programming with Python and UNIX. These abilities have enabled collaboration with scholars Dr. Donald Shaw and Dr. Maxwell McCombs, as they begin to test mass communication theories with big data online. Chris recently co-authored the book “Content is King: News Media Management in the Digital Age,” which is currently in press. Here Chris relies on his technical expertise and highlights approaches media managers can take to better market and profit from their online news content. His dissertation continues this research focusing on virality and diffusion on social media. Chris has three degrees in Advertising & Public Relations: a Ph.D. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a M.A. from The University of Alabama and a B.A. from The Pennsylvania State University. His background includes real-world public relations and digital marketing experience at SonyBMG Music, Porter Novelli and Fox/Dreamworks. In addition, Chris has worked in the IT field for over six years.

Barry Wellman
University of Toronto
Sociologist Barry Wellman codirects the NetLab network at the iSchool, University of Toronto. Wellman is the co-author (with Lee Rainie) of the award-winning Networked: The New Social Operating System and more than 200 papers with more than 80 coauthors. With fellow NetLabbers, his research has focused on the triple revolution: the intersection of the turn to social networks, the proliferation of the internet for communication and information, and the always-available digital media. Wellman is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and has received career achievement awards from the Oxford Internet Institute, the International Communication Association, the International Network for Social Network Analysis (which he founded in 1976) and both the Community and the Communication/Info tech sections of the American Sociological Association.

James C. Witte
George Mason University
James Witte is a professor of sociology, Director of the Center for Social Science Research (CSSR) and Director of the Institute for Immigration Research (IIR) at George Mason University. Witte, who earned his PhD from Harvard in 1991, has been a professor at Clemson University and Northwestern University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Carolina Population Center and a lecturer in sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His ongoing research looks at ways to use the internet to collect social science data and on the similarities and differences between online and off-line societies. Currently he is also serving as Co-PI on a major State Department funded initiative to reinvigorate the social sciences in Pakistan. Dr. Witte has written numerous articles that have appeared in journals such as The European Sociological Review, Population and Development Review andSociological Methods and Research. He has also published three books, Labor Force Integration and Marital Choice, the Internet and Social Inequality and The Normal Bar. The Normal Bar, co-authored with Chrisanna Northrup and Pepper Schwartz, was released in 2013 and made the New York Times bestseller list.


Volume 8: Doing and Being Digital: Mediated Childhoods
Author Biographies

Debashis “Deb” Aikat
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A former journalist, Debashis “Deb” Aikat has been a faculty member since 1995 in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning researcher and teacher, Aikat theorizes on social media, global communication, news media and the future of communication. Aikat’s research interests range across the mass media. His research has been published in book chapters and refereed journals such as First Amendment Studies, Global Media and Communication, Electronic Journal of Communication, Popular Music and Society, Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies and publications of the Association for Computing Machinery, Microsoft Corporation, and the International Radio and Television Society (IRTS).The Scripps Howard Foundation recognized Aikat as the inaugural winner of the “National Journalism Teacher of the Year award” (2003) for his “distinguished service to journalism education.” The IRTS named him the Coltrin Communications Professor of the Year (1997). Aikat worked as a journalist in India for the Ananda Bazar Patrika’s The Telegraph newspaper from 1984 through 1992. He also reported for the BBC World Service. Aikat earned a Ph. D. in Mass Communication and Journalism from Ohio University’s Scripps School of Journalism in 1995. He completed in 1990 a Certificate in American Political Culture from New York University. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Renee Bourdeaux
North Dakota State University
Renee Bourdeaux (B.A. and M.A., University of North Dakota) is a third-year doctoral student and instructor at North Dakota State University, and one of two Associate Directors at the NDSU Communication Research and Training Center. Ms. Bourdeaux specializes in interpersonal communication, with a focus on resilience and positivity in interpersonal and family relationships. Her current research projects explore families’ navigation of technology, resilience and relational maintenance in married relationships, and fast pace of life in relationships.

Coye Cheshire
University of California, Berkeley
Professor Coye Cheshire is Associate Professor at the UC Berkeley School of Information, where he teaches courses on computer-mediated communication, data science, research design, and social issues of information. He studies social exchange, trust, and interpersonal relationships in computer-mediated environments. His ongoing research includes mixed-methods studies of human motivation, social psychological incentives, organizational structure, and paths of participation in online sharing economies. Other key projects include a series of cross-societal experiments examining trust and shifts in modes of social exchange, a longitudinal study of online romantic relationships, and a qualitative study of organizations that design instrumented consumer experiences with user data. He has authored a variety of publications on trust and social interaction in online and offline environments, including co-editing the book in the Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust, eTrust: Forming Relationships in the Online World.

Shelia R. Cotten
Michigan State University
Shelia R. Cotten, a sociologist, is a Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. She studies technology use across the life course, and the social, educational, and health outcomes of using technologies. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Her work has been recently published in Computers & Education, Social Science & Medicine, Computers in Human Behavior, Journal of Family Issues, Journal of Applied Gerontology, Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, and Information, Communication, and Society. She and Laura Robinson are the co-editors of the Emerald Series in Media and Communication. She was the Chair of the Communication and Information Technologies section of the American Sociological Association (CITASA) during 2012-2013. In 2013, she won the award for Public Sociology from the Communication and Information Technologies section of the American Sociological Association.

Elizabeth L Davison
Appalachian State University
Elizabeth Davison is a professor of Sociology and Co-Director of University Documentary Film Services at Appalachian State University. Her many previous publications include works such as “Connection discrepancies: Unmasking further layers of the digital divide” in First Monday and “How do we rate? An evaluation of online student evaluations” in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education.

Nancy DiTunnariello
North Dakota State University
Nancy DiTunnariello (M.A., Kean University) is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Department of Communication at North Dakota State University and an associate director of the NDSU Communication Research and Training Center. Her research interests lie in interpersonal communication with a focus on communication within families. Her current research focuses on parent/child relationships, romantic relationships in times of stress and conflict, and gender studies within the context of families.

Erhardt Graeff
MIT
Erhardt Graeff is a civic media researcher, technologist, and entrepreneur. He currently works and studies at the MIT Center for Civic Media and MIT Media Lab. His latest projects involve building civic technologies that empower people to be greater agents of change, performing quantified analysis of media ecosystems, and documenting new forms of civic participation enabled by digital media. Prior to joining MIT, he researched the ethics of youth digital media use at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Outside of research, Erhardt is a founding trustee of The Awesome Foundation, which gives small grants to awesome projects. He was also the Co-Founder of BetterGrads, an online college mentoring program for high school students, and a founding member of the Web Ecology Project, a network of social media and internet culture researchers. Erhardt holds an MPhil in Modern Society and Global Transformations from the University of Cambridge and B.S. degrees in Information Technology and International Studies from Rochester Institute of Technology.

Airi Lampinen
Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT
University of Helsinki 
University of California, Berkeley
Doctor Airi Lampinen is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT / Aalto University. Her research interests include boundary regulation, interpersonal privacy, and the social implications of 'the sharing economy'. Her current projects are focused on participation in local online exchange and in network hospitality. Lampinen holds a Ph.D. in social psychology from University of Helsinki, Finland. Her doctoral research addressed interpersonal boundary regulation in the context of social network services. Next to her training as a social scientist, Lampinen has completed a B.Sc. degree in engineering at Aalto University, Finland. She was recently a Visiting Scholar at the School of Information at University of California, Berkeley. Previously, she has interned at Microsoft Research New England's Social Media Collective and at the Population Activities Unit of United Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

Robert LaRose
Michigan State University
Dr. LaRose is a full professor in the Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media at Michigan State University where he teaches graduate courses in research methods and theory and serves as Director of the Media and Information Studies PhD program. His research interests are the uses and effects of new media. His current foci are the role of habits in media behavior and the adoption of broadband Internet among vulnerable populations. He is the co-author of a popular introductory textbook, Media Now. He was presented with the Outstanding Article Award for 2011 by the International Communication Association. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Theory and Research from the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California.

Vilma Lehtinen
Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT 
University of Helsinki 
Doctor Vilma Lehtinen has studied the use of online services by users from different generations. In particular, she has focused on how individuals negotiate acceptable ways of use in everyday interaction. Lehtinen successfully defended her Ph.D. thesis in social psychology at the University of Helsinki in June 2014. Her doctoral research covered the construction of shared understandings of interpersonal relationships in online settings. Currently, Lehtinen develops online pedagogy at the University of Helsinki.

Christoph Lutz
University of St. Gallen
Christoph Lutz is a Ph.D. student in media and communication at the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland). His dissertation focuses on online participation and his other research interests include social media in science and public administration, online privacy and trust, and digital serendipity. His publications include: “The impact of online media on stakeholder engagement and the governance of corporations” in the Journal of Public Affairs and “Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants: Differences in Online Trust Formation” in the Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings. 

Caitlin McLaughlin
Bishop's University
Caitlin McLaughlin is an Assistant Professor in Marketing who completed her Ph. D. in Media & Information Studies, Advertising concentration, at Michigan State University. She is interested in studying how new media and word-of-mouth influence buying processes and how to improve advertising campaigns that encourage safe usae of products such as alcohol and tobacco.

Miriam Meckel
University of St. Gallen
Miriam Meckel is a professor for communication management and director of the Institute for Media and Communications Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Her research focuses on online communication, social media, corporate communications and the transformation of journalism. Her accomplishments include being awarded the Cicero-Speaker Prize in the category of Science and the Eisenhower Fellowship. She has also moderated her own TV show "Miriam Meckel - Standpunkte" (viewpoints) on the German news channel N-TV.

Carrie Anne Platt
North Dakota State University
Carrie Anne Platt (Ph.D., University of Southern California) is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at North Dakota State University. Her research program examines the cultural impact of emerging technologies, specifically how these technologies challenge boundaries between private and public life. Her current research focuses on young adults’ use of technology to negotiate relationships with their parents, siblings, and peers.

Giulia Ranzini
University of St Gallen
Giulia Ranzini is a Ph.D candidate at the University of St Gallen, Swizterland. Her research focuses on the impact of new and old media on the identities and wellbeing of users. Her other publications include: “I'll be your mirror: Identity reflections on the two sides of a computer screen” in Liminalities, “Antecedents of Social Media Use Among German Parliamentarians” in Researching the Changing Profession of Public Relations. 

Nora J. Rifon
Michigan State University
Nora J. Rifon (PhD, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York) is a Professor in the Department of Advertising and Public Relations, and founding Director of Children’s Central Research Collaborative at Michigan State University. Using a cognitive processing paradigm, she studies the effects of a wide range of marketing communications strategies on consumer behavior, including food and nutrition marketing, ecological or green advertising, and consumer online privacy policy issues.

Daniel B. Shank
University of Melbourne
Daniel B. Shank is a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne in Melbourne, Australia. His research spans sociological, psychological, and sociotechnical disciplines including interests in emotion, small group interaction, human-computer interaction, and social dilemmas. He has developed and tested theoretical explanations for how the identity-based differences in human-human and human-computer interaction can alter emotions, impressions, and behavior. With Shelia Cotten, he has examined different forms of digital inequality among youth related to their self-efficacy, levels of multitasking, gender, and race. Shank’s newest research projects focus on cooperation among groups of people involved in public goods dilemmas. He investigates how factors such as the parameters of the dilemma, value of the goods, number of people involved, and the individuals’ capacity for mobility alters the network structures of cooperation. Finally, he has also written overview and theoretical pieces on technology’s relationship with emotions, trust, interaction, and affect control theory.

Amanda J. Turner
Temple University
Amanda Turner is a doctoral student in Sociology at Temple University. She received her MA in Sociology from Temple University in 2013. Her research areas are culture and gender in the context of video game play. Her past work has included connecting textual analyses of video game content to interviews and focus groups with players of The Sims 2, Halo: Reach, and Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood in order to understand player experience and meaning making. Her dissertation work will continue this research while expanding to include analyses of video game production and the social world. She has also published on limitations of female empowerment in popular media. She presented an earlier version of “Play to Pay?: Games Matter for STEM Choice” at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association in New York in 2013.

Julia Crouse Waddell
University of Arkansas at Monticello
An Assistant Professor at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. Her research is situated at the intersections of new media, health communication, technology and society, and human behavior and psychology. Her research is geared toward understanding how the communicative processes among video game players can be utilized in learning and health communication. She will graduate with a Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2014. A graduate of the University of Florida, Prof. Waddell worked as a reporter for five years at the Ledger in Lakeland, Fla. There, she covered the education beat, consisting of a 100,000-student school district with nearly 10 local colleges and universities. She earned her master’s degree in mass communication with an emphasis on multimedia from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. When possible, Prof. Waddell plays video games or travels the world. However, life with a young son, active husband, two cats and their dog takes up most of her time.

Linda M. Waldron
Christopher Newport University
Linda M. Waldron, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Christopher Newport University in Virginia. She teaches courses on socialization and identity, media and popular culture, and youth violence. She is a qualitative researcher, specializing in studies about adolescent development, education and discipline policies, school shootings, and the social construction of race-class-gender inequalities in the media. With the support of an American Sociological Association Community Action grant, she also traveled to Kenya to examine the educational challenges facing young Maasai girls. Her research has been published in various scholarly journals, including Youth & Society, Sociology Compass, Sociological Studies of Children & Youth and Humanity & Society. Her more recent work focuses on girl fighting, cyber bullying, and the benefits and challenges of using social media and technology in today's classrooms. Prior to coming to CNU, she worked as a TV News Producer in Atlanta. She completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at Syracuse University with the support of an American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women. She also holds a M.A. in Sociology and a M.A. in Radio/TV/Film Production, both from Syracuse University.

Brian W. Ward
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Brian W. Ward received his PhD in sociology from the University of Maryland in 2010, where he specialized in demography and stratification. He is a Research Affiliate at the Center for Social Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Some of his research interests include alcohol and tobacco use among college students and adolescents, and the influences/processes that affect this use. His research has appeared in Journal of American College Health, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, and Health Education & Behavior, among other places. This past year he coauthored a book titled Mobility Impairment and the Construction of Identity, which was published by FirstForum Press.