Emerald Studies in Media and Communication

CURRENT CALLS

Deadline January 15, 2018

Volume: Theorizing the Digital: Social Theory & Digital Culture

Volume: Power, Media, & Everyday Life: Expanding the Intersectional


Volume: Theorizing the Digital: Social Theory and Digital Culture

Emerald Studies in Media and Communications is inviting submissions of original, unpublished papers on social theory and media. Tentatively entitled, Theorizing the Digital: Social Theory and Digital Culture. The submission deadline is January 15, 2018 for publication later that same year. We welcome submissions using a wide variety of data and analytic techniques, assuming they are rigorously employed. We also welcome theoretical submissions, assuming they focus squarely on the topic of the volume. Methodological papers will be considered as long as they are grounded in theoretical concerns. The scope of the volume is wide and includes application of classical and contemporary theorists in media contexts. Any topic that engages the volume’s theme is welcome. Potential topics could include: ethics, practices, and politics of “big data”; self, identity, and community; privacy, publicity and surveillance; personal and algorithmic patterns of curation; social network formation, maintenance, and change; news and (dis)information; visual representations; memes and virality; politics; mediated embodiment, etc.  

Volume: Power, Media, and Everyday Life: Expanding the Intersectional

Emerald Studies in Media and Communications is inviting submissions of original, unpublished papers on the theme of intersectionality and media. Tentatively entitled, Power, Media, and Everyday Life: Expanding the Intersectional. The submission deadline is January 15, 2018 for a publication date in mid 2019. We welcome submissions using a wide variety of data and analytic techniques, assuming they are rigorously employed, and theoretical or methodological submissions, assuming they focus squarely on the topic of the volume. The scope of this volume is wide, as it aims to contribute phenomenological and epistemic knowledge to the growing field of intersectionality. Submissions are welcome on any topics that speak to intersectionality as it relates to media including gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, and disability. In addition, we are also especially interested in papers that expand and broaden the discourse of intersectionality vis-à-vis media to include: Parenthood, Religion, Nationality, Immigration, Language, Political Association, Aging, etc.

Submission Guidelines: Deadline January 15, 2018 by email: editorial@emeraldmediastudies.com

Submissions should be approximately 7,000-10,000 in length inclusive of abstract, references, and notes. American or British spelling may be used. All submissions must include 1) title of manuscript, 2) abstract up to 250 words, and 3) up to 6 keywords, 4)  main text with headings, 5) references, and 6) as appropriate to the submission appendices, images, figures, and/or tables. While no special formatting is requested at the outset, upon acceptance authors must gain all permissions and format their manuscripts in accordance with the series' guidelines. Submissions may be considered for either volume.

For initial submissions, follow these four steps or your submission may not be considered:

1. Prepare two versions of the submission: 1) PDF for anonymous review and 2) Word with author info.
2. Use the title of your submission when naming your copies of your submissions in both Word and PDF.
3. ​Put the title of your submission and your volume preference in the subject line of your email.
4. Email both copies of your submission in a single email to editorial@emeraldmediastudies.com 

Anonymized Review Copy in PDF
Title of your submission + Anonymized (example: "Submission Title Anonymized")
Remove any author information and affiliations and save doc as PDF

Editorial Copy in Word
Title of your submission + Editorial (example: "Submission Title Editorial")
In a Word document, include all elements above, as well as a title page with all author names, emails, and bios of up to 250 words.

Please address any questions to: editorial@emeraldmediastudies.com.


Editorial Team: Theorizing the Digital: Social Theory and Digital Culture

Guest Editors (in alphabetical order): 
Jenny L. Davis and Gabe Ignatow

Jenny Davis (@Jenny_L_Davis) is a Lecturer/Assistant Professor in the School of Sociology at the Australian National University and co-editor of the Cyborgology Blog (Cyborgology.org). She studies identity, culture, and technology, with a particular focus on status and stigma. She approaches her research theoretically and methodologically from multiple directions, utilizing formal theory and experimental work, participant observation and ethnography. Her work is published across Sociology, Communication, and Media Studies.

Gabe Ignatow is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of North Texas where he has taught since 2007. His research interests are in the areas of sociological theory, text mining and analysis methods, new media, and information policy. Gabe’s current research involves working with computer scientists and statisticians to adapt text mining and topic modeling techniques for social science applications. He has served as the UNT Department of Sociology’s graduate program co-director and undergraduate program director and has been selected as a faculty fellow at the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University. He is also a co-founder and the CEO of GradTrek, a graduate degree search engine company. Gabe has been working with mixed methods of text analysis since the 1990s, is the author of over 30 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Sociological Forum, the Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, and Studies in Media and Communications. His has published books include: 2018 An Introduction to Text Mining (with Rada Mihalcea) with Sage, 2017 Text Mining: A Guidebook for the Social Sciences (with Rada Mihalcea) with Sage, and 2007 Transnational Identity Politics and the Environment, Lexington Books.

Series Editors (in alphabetical order): 
John Baldwin, Heloisa Pait, Laura Robinson, Jeremy Schulz, and Apryl Williams

John Baldwin (PhD, Arizona State University, 1994) is a professor of culture and communication, communication theory and qualitative research methods at Illinois State University. He has co-edited a book on definitions of culture (Redefining Culture, 2006) and co-authored a textbook, Intercultural Communication for Everyday Life (2014). His areas of interest include intercultural and intergroup communication, including adjustment, competence, as well as identity, prejudice, and tolerance. Recent research focuses on the social construction of identities in Brazilian rock music of the dictatorship era. He is conversational in Spanish and Portuguese, but also has interest in other languages and cultures.

Heloisa Pait investigates the challenges posed by the introduction of new means of communication for democratic life, with emphasis on the personal dilemmas individuals encounter when presented with unknown sociabilities. In her doctoral dissertation at the New School for Social Research she investigated the personal challenges television soap opera writers and viewers faced in trying to make mass communication a meaningful activity. She has written on the reception of international news, on media use by Brazilian youth, and on the disruptive role of the internet in the Brazilian political environment. With her students, Heloisa investigates conceptions of memory and media use, the role of media in notions of secrecy in international relations, and the nature of public protests in Brazilian cities. Dealing with a broad range of subjects, her recurrent issue is the efforts individuals make to engage in communication with others, an activity always disrupted and reconstructed – revealed – by every material transformation of media. Heloisa Pait, a Fulbright alumna and member of the advisory board of Open Knowledge Brazil, actively participates in Brazilian public life. Her fiction work has appeared in American and Brazilian publications.

Laura Robinson is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD from UCLA, where she held a Mellon Fellowship in Latin American Studies and received a Bourse d’Accueil at the École Normale Supérieure. In addition to holding a postdoctoral fellowship on a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation funded project at the USC Annenberg Center, Robinson has served as Affiliated Faculty at the ISSI at UC Berkeley, Visiting Assistant Professor at Cornell University, and Visiting Scholar at Trinity College Dublin. She is Series Co-Editor for Emerald Studies in Media and Communications and a past chair for the ASA Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section. Her track record includes thirty five publications including six edited books and seventeen peer-reviewed articles in top-tier journals including Sociological Methodology, Information, Communication and Society, New Media & Society, and Sociology. Several of her publications have earned awards from CITASA, AOIR, and NCA IICD.

Jeremy Schulz is a Visiting Scholar at the UC Berkeley Institute for the Study of Societal Issues. He is also an Affiliate at the UC San Diego Center for Research on Gender in the Professions and has served as a Council Member of the ASA Section on Consumers and Consumption. Previously, he held an NSF-funded postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell University after earning his PhD at UC Berkeley. He has published on a broad range of topics, including consumption, work, family, culture, and inequalities. His article “Winding Down the Workday,” published in Qualitative Sociology, received the Shils-Coleman Award from the American Sociological Association Theory Section. His recent publications include “Talk of Work,” published in Theory and Society and “Shifting Grounds and Evolving Battlegrounds,” published in the American Journal of Cultural Sociology. Other publications are in first-quartile journals including Information, Communication and Society; Theory and Society; Sociology; Journal of Consumer Culture; and Culture; Theory, and Critique; and Sociological Methodology.

Apryl A. Williams earned her PhD in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. She is Assistant Professor at Susquehanna University, as well as a Research Associate at the Center on Conflict and Development and a member of the USAID Higher Education Solutions Network. She has made a variety of contributions to the sociologies of race, gender, and culture as well as to the field of media studies. Apryl’s studies based on her intersectional approach to race, gender, media, and inequalities have been published in the International Journal of Communication and Information, Communication & Society.She has also conducted original research on digital inequality in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Williams has overseen the production of several publications dealing with international representations of race in media and comparative media landscapes. Her additional research interests include postmodernism, critical theory, and fat studies.


Editorial Team: Power, Media, and Everyday Life: Expanding the Intersectional

Guest Editor: 
Ruth Tsuria

Ruth Tsuria is an Assistant Professor at the College of Communication at Seton Hall University. She recently earned her PhD in the Department of Communication at Texas A&M University, for her dissertation work titled New Media in the Jewish Bedroom: Exploring Jewish Online Discourse Concerning Gender and Sexuality. Her work on the intersections of digital culture, religion, gender and sexulaity and has been published in leading journals in the field, including The Communication Review, and Social Media+Society. She is interested in culture, terminologies, media, technology, discourse and social order.  

Series Editors (in alphabetical order): 
Laura Robinson and Apryl Williams

Laura Robinson is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD from UCLA, where she held a Mellon Fellowship in Latin American Studies and received a Bourse d’Accueil at the École Normale Supérieure. In addition to holding a postdoctoral fellowship on a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation funded project at the USC Annenberg Center, Robinson has served as Affiliated Faculty at the ISSI at UC Berkeley, Visiting Assistant Professor at Cornell University, and Visiting Scholar at Trinity College Dublin. She is Series Co-Editor for Emerald Studies in Media and Communications and a past chair for the ASA Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section. Her track record includes thirty five publications including six edited books and seventeen peer-reviewed articles in top-tier journals including Sociological Methodology, Information, Communication and Society, New Media & Society, and Sociology. Several of her publications have earned awards from CITASA, AOIR, and NCA IICD.

Apryl A. Williams (@AprylW) earned her PhD in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. She is an Assistant Professor at Susquehanna University, as well as a Research Associate at the Center on Conflict and Development, a member of the USAID Higher Education Solutions Network. She has made a variety of contributions to the sociologies of race, gender, and culture as well as to the field of media studies. Apryl’s studies, based on her intersectional approach to race, gender, media, and inequalities, have been published in the International Journal of Communication, Information, Communication & Society, and Social Sciences. She has also conducted original research on digital inequality in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Williams has overseen the production of several publications dealing with international representations of race in media and comparative media landscapes. Her additional research interests include postmodernism, critical theory, and studies of the body.